MLC Panui - July 2021
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MLC Panui
The National Pānui containing a schedule of all upcoming applications for hearing by the Māori Land Court for July 2021 
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Māori Land Online
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Māori Land Court
Māori Land Online provides a snapshot of current ownership, trustee, memorial and block information for land that falls within the jurisdiction of the Māori Land Court under Te Ture Whenua Māori Act 1993 and other legislation.
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Parininihi ki Waitotara Incorporation
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Unclaimed Money
Over half (60%) of all PKW shareholders are missing and although they try to find these shareholders it is a constant challenge. As a result of missing shareholders they hold over $4.8M in unclaimed dividends.
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MLC Panui - June 2021
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MLC Panui
 The National Pānui containing a schedule of all upcoming applications for hearing by the Māori Land Court for June 2021.
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Glossary of terms used in disposal list
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Māori Affairs
This post  provides brief explanations of each term, and guidance as to which stage of the disposal process the property has reached. 
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Crown property - (RFR)
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Māori Affairs
Crown agencies hold land and property for a range of reasons. Where the Crown has reached a Treaty settlement with an iwi claimant group, this land may become subject to a Right of First Refusal (RFR) in favour of that iwi. 
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Taui Joseph Pinker
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Arthur Westmacott Falwasser
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MLC Panui - May 2021
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MLC Panui
The National Pānui containing a schedule of all upcoming applications for hearing by the Māori Land Court for May 2021.  
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Simple and uncontested succession
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Māori Land Court
With changes to Te Ture Whenua Māori Act 1993 in Feb 2021, we want to highlight some things to look out for now that these changes have been made.
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Uruaokapuarangi
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Hapū & Iwi
The Uruaokapuarangi (Uruao), captained by Rākaihautū, who was accompanied by his wife Waiariki-o-āio and their son Rakihouia, landed at Whakatū (Nelson). 
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Mānuka and Ārai-te-uru
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Hapū & Iwi
The Mānuka canoe set out for Hawaiki, the Polynesian homeland, and successfully returned with a cargo of kūmara (sweet potato). 
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Pangatoru, Motumotuahi, Te Rangiuamutu, Te Wakaringaringa and Te Kōhatuwhenua
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Hapū & Iwi
. The traditions of the Taranaki tribes of Ngāti Ruanui and Ngā Rauru name at least five other ancestral leaders, and the canoes they captained. They are: Rakeiwānangaora of the PangatoruPuatautahi of the MotumotuahiTamatearokai of Te Rangiuamutu (this canoe is also sometimes called Tairea)Māwakeroa of Te Wakaring...
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Kahutara, Taikōria and Ōkoki
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Hapū & Iwi
According to one Taranaki account, some of the earliest inhabitants of New Zealand landed at Ngāmotu near New Plymouth on three canoes, the Kahutara, the Taikōria, and the Ōkoki. 
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Aotea and Te Rīrino
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Hapū & Iwi
The Aotea left Hawaiki after a dispute between its captain, Turi, and a chief, Uenuku. 
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Kurahaupō
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Hapū & Iwi
 The Taranaki tribes say that Te Moungaroa was the captain of the Kurahaupō and that the canoe was wrecked in Hawaiki, or on Rangitāhua, an island in the middle of the sea, and that the crew were brought to Aotearoa on the Mataatua or Aotea canoes. The Rangitāne tribe of the Manawatū, Wairarapa and Hawke’s Bay reg...
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Tokomaru and Tahatuna
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Hapū & Iwi
 The earliest Taranaki canoe tradition says that conflict arose in Hawaiki when a party of spear-makers, led by Tūpenu and employed by the chief Manaia, had molested Manaia’s wife, Rongotiki. Manaia’s people attacked and killed the workmen. Retribution followed, during which several of Manaia’s people were killed. Manaia took the Tokomaru...
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Tākitimu
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Hapū & Iwi
 The Tākitimu canoe is known in several regions. Northern East Coast accounts say that the Tākitimu left Hawaiki after a dispute between the people of the chief Uenuku, and those of Ruawharo and Tūpai. It is said that Ruawharo and his younger brother Tūpai then took the Tākitimu from their rivals and came to New Z...
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Horouta
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Hapū & Iwi
The Horouta canoe belonged to Toi, the great Polynesian explorer. One day Kahukura, a visitor from Hawaiki, arrived with some dried kūmara (sweet potato), which the locals had never eaten before. Toi gave the canoe to Kahukura to go and obtain the kūmara back in Hawaiki. After retrieving the vegetables, Kahukura sent them back on the ...
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Nuku-tai-memeha, Nukutere and Paikea
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Hapū & Iwi
For Ngāti Porou, the Nuku-tai-memeha of Māui is the foundation canoe. According to tradition it lies upturned in stone on Hikurangi mountain.
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Tōtara-i-kāria and Aotearoa
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Hapū & Iwi
 The Tōtara-i-kāria canoe is said to have been taken by the priest Ngātoroirangi back to Hawaiki, where he fought a battle at Ihumotomotokia and Whatatiri against the chief Manaia. 
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Ngā Māhanga-a-Tuamatua
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Hapū & Iwi
 The canoe Ngā Māhanga-a-Tuamatua (the twins of Tuamatua) is sometimes considered to be an ancient reference to both the Tainui and Te Arawa canoes. 
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Tainui
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Hapū & Iwi
 ... The Tainui canoe, under the command of Hoturoa, landed at Whangaparāoa about the same time as Te Arawa. A whale was found stranded on the beach and the place was accordingly named Whangaparāoa (whale bay). The people of both canoes claimed ownership of the whale, whose flesh, bones and teeth were valuable for food, orn...
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Te Arawa
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Hapū & Iwi
. Te Arawa and its crew left Hawaiki after a conflict over food resources involving Houmaitawhiti and his sons Tamatekapua and Whakatūria against the chiefs Toi and Uenuku. When Whakatūria was killed, Tamatekapua departed on the Arawa, having kidnapped Ngātoroirangi (Ngātoro) from the Tainui canoe to act as his navigator. H...
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