The Waikato River
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Awa
The Waikato River is the longest river in New Zealand. Its catchment covers 14,260 square km or 12 per cent of the area of the North Island. The river starts its journey to the sea from high in the central North Island volcanic zone, 2797 metres above sea level.
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History of the Māori language
Ajmcveigh
Māoritanga
Major initiatives launched from the 1980s have brought about a revival of te reo. In the early 21st century, about 125,000 people of Māori ethnicity could speak and understand te reo, which was an official language alongside New Zealand Sign Language.
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Our Huia
Ajmcveigh
Taiao (Environment)
The huia is an extinct species of New Zealand Bird prevalent in the North island of New Zealand. The last confirmed sighting of a huia was in 1907, although there were credible sightings into the 1960s
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Reviving Moko Kauae
Alysha
Māoritanga
As I look at our whānau and the various tupuna paintings and photographs it is easy to see the beauty in carrying your whakapapa in such a prominent way. 
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History of Omahu Marae, Ngati Hinemanu and Ngati Upokoiri
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Marae
Take a look at the history of Omahu Marae, between Napier and Hastings, and iwi Ngati Kahungunu and hapu Ngati Hinemanu and Ngati Upokoiri.
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Ko Wai au?
lynzlynxnz
Ko wai au?
Taranaki te maunga tapuMohakatino te awaNgāti Mutunga te iwiNgāti Raumati me Kai tangata ngā hapūTe Ruapekapeka te MaraeHamiora Wharematangi Raumati raua ko Parehaereone Matuku taku tūpunaTe Ratutonu taku matua I te taha o taku māmāNgāti Maniapoto me Ngāti Wahiao -Tuhourangi ngā iwiTame Roa raua ko Eva Te Wehi o Te Rangi Brady taku tūpuna Lily Edna Rangi Amohia taku whaeaKo Lynne Parehaereone Raumati ahau.
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MLC Panui - March 2022
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MLC Panui
The National Pānui containing a schedule of all upcoming applications for hearing by the Māori Land Court for March 2022 
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Ngāti Wāhiao
Alysha
Hapū & Iwi
Te Whakarewarewa-tanga-o-te-ope-taua-a-Wāhiao (The Uprising of the Army of Wāhiao) is home to the Ngāti Wāhiao people . Over 300 years ago, a war party led by the warrior Wāhiao had gathered and, hidden by geothermal steam, performed a Haka before charging into battle.  To those familiar to the village they call it Whakarewarewa or Whaka.
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Ko Adrian McVeigh Ahau
Ajmcveigh
Ko wai au?
Brought up by Pakeha and only feeling the pull of my tupuna in the last 10 years, I have been frustrated at trying to gather information on my history and whakapapa but realise this is part of my journey.
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Te Ruki Kawiti
Ajmcveigh
Tīpuna/Tūpuna
Te Ruki Kawiti was a distinguished leader and great fighting chief of the Ngāti Hine hapu. Kawiti led his people against the British during the Northern War. He was an excellent strategist and tactician, and will forever be remembered as the architect of Ruapekapeka pā
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Waiomio Valley
Ajmcveigh
Wāhi (Places)
Waiomio Valley is the ancestral land and heart of the Ngati Hine people. The Ngati Hine have lived continuously for centuries in this area and are members of the Ngapuhi tribe.
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What legacy will you leave behind?
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Te Ao Māori
MLI is all about making connections, being notified and informed and sharing information but what is it really all about? Succession planning is about more than just land. It's about passing on what's important to future generations.
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Te Tiriti O Waitangi 1840
Sandra212
Māori Affairs
Te Tiriti O Waitangi is a 9 page document. Seven on paper and two on parchment.While named after the place of signing in the Bay of Plenty, together they represent the agreement between the British Crown (Labour Party, National Party, Green Party, Maori Party, Act..) and: the Maori Cheiftains (who do not exist today... (grrr)Leave your thoughts, suggestions and ANY relevent information in the comment section, subscribe to this blog and lets sort this by 2030 for our tupuna and the future of New Zealand, Aotearoa.
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Mt Taranaki
Ajmcveigh
Maunga
Mt Taranaki is hugely important to local Māori. In tradition, the mountain once lived in the central North Island, and competed with the other mountains to win beautiful Mt Pīhanga. When Taranaki lost, he fled west, gouging out the Whanganui River.
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Succession - Forms 21 & 22
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MLC Applications
Succession is the transfer of shares from a deceased owner to their descendants and beneficiaries. There are different types of succession depending on various situations so below is an overview and the applications depending on your situation.
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Ngaa Rauru Paa
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Wāhi (Places)
I do not know the name or history of this paa, but it is in the Ngaa Rauru territory, south of Waverly and near Okotuku Road
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Kuranui Paa
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Wāhi (Places)
Kuranui Paa is around 2 kilometres down from the Patea Dam or Lake Rotorangi,and in a bend on the Patea River
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Kanihi Pā
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Wāhi (Places)
Kanihi pā is located half a mile off the Austin Rd and beside a bend in the Waingongoro River known as Oparua.  This fortress is in the area known as Te Rua-o-te-Moko.
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Matariki
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Māoritanga
One of the many stories around Matariki
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MLC Panui - January 2022
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MLC Panui
The National Pānui containing a schedule of all upcoming applications for hearing by the Māori Land Court for January 2022
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MLC Panui - February 2022
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MLC Panui
The National Pānui containing a schedule of all upcoming applications for hearing by the Māori Land Court for February 2022
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Tuhoe whakapapa
Adele
Te Ao Māori

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MLC Panui - December 2021
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MLC Panui
 The National Pānui containing a schedule of all upcoming applications for hearing by the Māori Land Court for December 2021
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Nga Puawai o Ngapuhi
Ajmcveigh
Waiata
"Here we are, the fruit of our parents' hard work, blossoming before them."
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