Ruru

Ruru

In Māori tradition the Ruru is strongly associated with the spirit world and act as messengers.

The Ruru cry is thought to be a bearer of good news or a good sign but the high pitched 'squee or yelp' was thought to be a warning of bad news or events.

Ruru are commonly found in forests throughout mainland New Zealand and on offshore islands.  Females are bigger than the males and Ruru have acute hearing with a sensitivity to light hence their nocturnal nature. Ruru are speckled brown with yellow eyes and they have a short tail.

The watchful nature of the Ruru and their symbolism as kaitiaki (guardians), protection, forewarning and advisors make them the perfect badge for members appreciating posts or queries in the community groups.
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Comments 2

Patience on Saturday, 19 March 2022 13:53

Absolutely LOVE! We have a Ruru couple who overlooks our entire area in Whanganui. Never seen the female before but you can definately hear her!

It would be interesting to know if the feathers can be used for korowai.. anyone know? I learnt many iwi do not use Peacock feathers

Absolutely LOVE! We have a Ruru couple who overlooks our entire area in Whanganui. Never seen the female before but you can definately hear her! It would be interesting to know if the feathers can be used for korowai.. anyone know? I learnt many iwi do not use Peacock feathers
Alysha on Saturday, 19 March 2022 15:12

I'm sure that times and availability of species have meant changes to the types of feathers used today. Traditionally they used what was at hand and mana was elevated through the use of specific bird feathers e.g. kiwi and huia. Just out of interest - Te Papa has a collection of over 100 feathered cloaks that were examined to analyse the types of feathers used. Feathers from at least 24 native species were used in their collections: Kiwi, Kereru, Kākā, Tui, Chicken, Pheasant, Peacock, Weka, Pukeko, Kakariki Parrot, Wild Turkey, Toroa, Mallard, Baded Rail, Koekoea, Quali, Guinea Fowl, Huia, Matuku, Kakapo, Ruru, Kahu, Pipiwharauroa and Yellowhammer.

I'm sure that times and availability of species have meant changes to the types of feathers used today. Traditionally they used what was at hand and mana was elevated through the use of specific bird feathers e.g. kiwi and huia. Just out of interest - Te Papa has a collection of over 100 feathered cloaks that were examined to analyse the types of feathers used. Feathers from at least 24 native species were used in their collections: Kiwi, Kereru, Kākā, Tui, Chicken, Pheasant, Peacock, Weka, Pukeko, Kakariki Parrot, Wild Turkey, Toroa, Mallard, Baded Rail, Koekoea, Quali, Guinea Fowl, Huia, Matuku, Kakapo, Ruru, Kahu, Pipiwharauroa and Yellowhammer.
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